Friday’s Internet Marketing News Roundup

This will likely be the last news post until after Christmas. Here’s what’s caught my attention today.

  1. Avinash Kaushik discusses the merits of javascript analytics over web log files.
  2. Robert Scoble has re-discovered banner ads. He explains how Texas Instruments’ banner ads managed to catch his attention.
  3. Mashable is reporting LinkedIn has secured new funding which suggests the company has a $250 million value.
  4. Social media expert, Neil Patel, explains why some SEO web sites are being banned by Digg. Digg just doesn’t like SEO. Maybe the social bookmark site is receiving cash incentives from Did-It.
  5. Is MSN inflating the conversion data at adCenter? Search Engine Roundtable takes a look.
  6. Wengo is offering an embedded flash player for bloggers wishing to share their good looks via their web cam.

The Marketing Pilgrim Comment Clinic

I need your help. Actually, other Marketing Pilgrim readers need your help.

I’ve noticed more visitors leaving questions on posts that have long since retired to the archives. Not wanting to let them live out the rest of their lives in obscurity, I thought I’d test shining a spotlight on them.

So, I’m going to keep my eye on any interesting questions posted in our comments and highlight them in new posts.

Kicking-off this experiment comes a question from Demetrius

Channel Sponsors

Don’t Miss Thursday’s Hottest Internet Marketing News

The internet marketing world appears to be winding down for Christmas, so news is on the lighter side. However, I’ve dug deep and come up with these hot items.

  1. Lee Odden has discovered his Top Rank Blog has been permanently banned on Digg, just because it posts SEO content. What the…?  Lee wasn’t doing anything wrong, apparently some diggers have enough clout to get a site a pre-emptive ban.
  2. Do you know what SearchRank’s David Wallace wants for Christmas? No it’s not a Playstation 3 (although I am sure he wouldn’t say “no”). David lists five things he’d like to see happen in the SEM world, including adding blog spammers to Santa’s “naughty list”.

Voting Begins for 2006 Search Blogs Awards

Voting is open for Search Engine Journal’s Search Blog Awards. The nominations are full of my favorite blogs and voting is going to be tough.

Thanks to the readers that nominated Marketing Pilgrim. We’re nominated in two categories, Search Marketing Blog and Best Agency Resource Blog. I’m not sure how we made it into the Search Marketing Blog and not the Search News Blog  category- after all, 80% of our stuff is news related – oh well.

For the Best Agency Resource Blog, we’re up against just one other nomination – Yippee!. It happens to be SEOmoz – oh crap! The only chance we have of winning that is if Rand uploads a post explaining why voting for us is the duty of every mozzer. ;-)

Marketing Pilgrim Goes Mobile

Thanks to the WordPress PDA plugin, found via WordPress SEO, Marketing Pilgrim is now cell phone and PDA compatible. Simply point your mobile to the normal domain and you’ll see a stripped down version of our site.

Here’s how it looks…

Have you tested your WordPress blog in a mobile browser? Opera Mini has a mobile simulator you can use.

Google “Tip” at Top of Search Results

While doing a site search today that included the word “blog” in the domain I noticed something new. At the very top of the search results was an ad disguised as what Google called a “Tip.”

Blogger Ad

I tested additional keyword searches for which Google has related or competing services but they seem to be drinking their own koolaid and running Adword ads for their other branches. Blog searches seem to be the only results which contain this type of ad.

I find it deceptive on their part to call this a “Tip.” This is a blatant ad which I’m sure is getting some amazing CTR due to having the only other image on the page besides the logo.

Anyone else see this type of ad for any other Google service?

Google Shutting Out Tool Developers with API Removal

You may not have heard but Google has closed their Google Search SOAP API and replaced it with a new Google Ajax Search API.

What’s the big deal? The new API doesn’t easily allow third-party tool developers to utilize Google search results. So why in the world would Google take such a backward step? One reason, the new API allows them to better control how developers use Google’s search results.

Existing users of the API will still be supported.