Blinkx It? I Don’t Know What the Heck to Do With It!

I’m with Pete Cashmore on this one. Popular video search engine, Blinkx, had launched a widget for blog owners and social networks (MySpace etc) that allows them to display relevant videos on their site.

But why?

Ok, so the videos are targeted, and the widget is not very intrusive, but where’s the benefit for me? Us? Bloggers?

I already have a number of widgets on Marketing Pilgrim – each already slowing down load times. In order to convince me to add another one, a widget needs to offer either:

  1. Some kind of revenue for me
  2. A strong value to my readers – so they’ll come back, tell others etc

I fail to see where Blinkx It meets either of these criteria. Anyone seeing a benefit, I’m missing?

Hiring Stephen Colbert to Help with Wikipedia NoFollow Campaign

I think I’ve just discovered the new spokesman for our “Nofollow me to Wikipedia” campaign – Stephen Colbert.

As Rand points out, Colbert has already taken many stabs at Wikipedia – even getting his viewers to change the entry on “elephants” to say the population has tripled in the past ten years. His latest funnies include:

Wikipedia – The encyclopedia where you can be an authority, even if you don’t know what the hell you’re talking about.

My favorite is when he offers $5 to the first person who changes the entry on “reality” to “reality is a commodity”. Then mocks all those that might say “that’s not what reality is”..

“Oh really? Go and look it up on Wikipedia, I think you’ll find that I’m right”

Channel Sponsors

Can Technorati Challenge Digg with New Site?

Don’t miss other great marketing news, subscribe to our RSS feed!

Steve Rubel managed to capture a screenshot of a new site called WTF (Where’s the Fire), before it was taken down. It appears to be the work of Technorati, the well known and trusted blog search engine.

Boy, I’m excited to see this move by them. Digg has become a very closed community, and it’s virtually impossible to have your site featured, if the top users decide they just don’t like you. Combine that with a very tech-focused audience, and Digg becomes less compelling as a resource for readers or those being featured.

WTF is likely to be a huge hit, combining the trust of Technorati and the features of Digg (and maybe a dash of Techmeme). I’m looking forward to the official word – this is a community I think I can finally get behind.

Jeremy Zawodny Apologizes

UPDATE 8: Jeremy Zawodny has changed his post and apologized to me via email. Here’s what he said on his blog:

You see, the little voice that normally tells me when to step away from the computer wasn’t working today, and I ended up making a big mess as a result. I’m really sorry about that…Andy, the MyBlogLog guys, and anyone else who wasted time reading this: I f#cked up. I know better (most of the time) and should have just gone on with life….I’ve already emailed you all privately, but wanted to say so in public as well.

I’m grateful that Jeremy has changed the title of the post. My reputation is important to me – I left two companies to protect it – so it was the title that irked me the most. I now consider the issue closed

Google Gains, Yahoo & MSN Mixed Bag

Nielsen//NetRatings reported a week ago that Google had more than 50% of the search market share in December 2006. The data for the top three (compared with comScore Networks’ data from the same period, released Jan 15):

Provider Searches (000) Share of Searches comScore Queries/Share
Google Search 3,035,617 50.8% 3.2 billion / 43.7%
Yahoo! Search 1,412,904 23.6% 1.9 billion / 28.5%
MSN/Windows Live Search 499,946 8.4% 713 million / 10.5%

Clearly, and unsurprisingly, comScore and Nielsen differ on their estimations of each search engine’s popularity. comScore’s stats give MSN and Yahoo a better projection than Nielsen.

Inside Google at the Blog News Channel noted that Yahoo! is growing at a faster rate than Google (Yahoo’s growth rate: 30.1%; Google’s: 22.6%). Of course, it’s easy to grow faster when you’re half as big.

Yahoo Delete URL Feature Disaster Waiting to Happen

Yahoo announced a number of very nice new features for Site Explorer today. The Yahoo Search Blog has a full list.

The feature I am most interested in and also worried about is the new “delete URL” feature. It is literally a disaster waiting to happen. There is zero verification other than being logged into the proper Yahoo account to delete an entire site from the Yahoo index.

With Google you are required to upload a robots.txt file to the webserver that verifies the same information being requested through the Google delete URL/Site tool. With Yahoo, you just log in, click delete, click confirm, and it’s gone.

Most SEOs are crooks?

It appears that even local newspapers have gotten in on the SEO-bashing. On Sunday, the Rapid City Journal published what appears to be a column entitled “Optimizers not optimal for getting site noticed.” The author, Claire Scholz, states:

For the most part, search engine optimizers are — do I dare say it out loud? — crooks. They promise the sky and all the golden-top-10-Google-rankings beneath it. They make cold calls or send cold spam (yuck) to otherwise smart business owners and, within minutes, the owner is rattling off the company’s credit card number to his or her new best friend.

I understand that there are many unscrupulous “SEOs” out there, but I wouldn’t say that “most” of them are “crooks.” The ever-skeptical Scholz offers four guidelines to avoid these bad guys, some of which are decent: