Google AdSense Bans Images Next to Ads

I must admit, I’ve been tempted to experiment with adding images next to Google AdSense ads. I have seen other bloggers use them and heard them gush over how they can help increase click-thru-rates. Unfortunately, Google has just decided that they are not fair to the users (and the advertiser) and have banned images alongside AdSense.

We ask that publishers not line up images and ads in a way that suggests a relationship between the images and the ads. If your visitors believe that the images and the ads are directly associated, or that the advertiser is offering the exact item found in the neighboring image, they may click the ad expecting to find something that isn’t actually being offered. That’s not a good experience for users or advertisers.

Google Acquires Swiss Internet Mapping Company

Not all Google acquisitions have a $1.65B price tag – in fact very few do. Google has gone back to snapping-up small interesting technology companies, with the acquisition of Endoxon, an internet mapping solutions company (actually, they only acquired 3 of the company’s 6 business units).

The Endoxon team has demonstrated passion and innovation in online mapping and has developed compelling technology that will enhance our Google geo products worldwide. We’re also excited about having a dedicated team in Europe that can bring a distinctively European focus to our Maps products in those markets.

It must be hard for a small company to resist the lure of being part of Google, yet allowed to continue operating in Europe. Google’s becoming the new internet incubator!

Channel Sponsors

The “Long Copy” format: can it work for you?

The new SEO Book sales letter has been live for a little while now. (I’d love to know how it’s doing so far!) Although I think pretty much all Internet marketing sales letters are eerily remniscent of Kevin Trudeau infomercials, this is a definite improvement.

Brian Clark at Copyblogger, who rewrote the page for Aaron, unveiled the letter with an explanation on why the copy is so long (emphasis added):

  • This is not a John Grisham paperback. It is specialized and continually-updated SEO knowledge with a $79 price tag. Most people desire and require a lot of information before they will make this type of purchase.

My Interview with Lee Odden

Lee Odden has an interview with me posted on his blog. Lee know’s how to ask some interesting questions, and one question in particular got me fired-up…

Competition is increasing in the search marketing industry and despite some questionable analysis (Marketing Sherpa) and characterizations (Dave Pasternack) what are some of the most significant opportunities for companies that still have not yet embraced SEO into their marketing budgets?

99 Tips for Branding a Web Site on the Cheap

Aviva Directory has 99 fantastic tips for anyone looking to build, launch and brand a new web site.

This is going in my bookmarks!

iPod Winner Announced

Congratulations to Kevin Henney who wins an iPod Shuffle for spotting our secret RSS-only message last Thursday.

Thanks to all of you who subscribed to the Marketing Pilgrim feed. We hope you’ll keep your subscription due to the great content, but just in case you were about to hit the “unsubscribe” button, you’ll be pleased to know we’ll be running another contest in the New Year.

The Internet is the first choice for purchasing decisions

Last week, Vertis Communications released their Consumer Focus® Tech Savvy study. The headline they ran with was “Future Plans Reveal Women to be More Tech Savvy.” That conclusion was based on their finding that 74% of Generation Y women (born 1977-1994) are planning on buying at least one electronic device in the next year, versus 58% of all 3000 adults surveyed. (Electronic devices included televisions, cell phones, digital cameras, satellite dishes and more.)

The study’s most interesting stat for an Internet marketer? Gen Y men’s answer to the question “When you are ready to make a purchase, which media do you turn to first to help you with your decision?” 38% said the Internet was their first choice to help them make a purchasing decision. That was up from 21% in 2004. In fact, the Internet was the only medium to see an increase in that time period (unless you count “None”).