Why Google is Safe from Trademark Infringement on AdWords

Just finished reading Eric Sinrod’s analysis of why a judge decided in favor of Google in a law suit filed by Rescuecom.

Here’s Sinrod’s take on why the judge allowed Google to continue to accept bids on trademarked terms…

…Judge Mordue accepted all of Rescuecom’s alleged facts as true and yet still found that none of these alleged facts established trademark use by Google…he came to this conclusion, in part, because “there is no allegation that (Rescuecom’s) trademark is displayed in any of the sponsored links about which (Rescuecom) is concerned.”

“There is no allegation that (Google) places (Rescuecom’s) trademark on any goods, containers, displays or advertisements, or that its internal use is visible to the public,” the judge concluded.

Google Gadgets for Your Web Site

Google’s opened up its “Gadgets” to allow them to be added to any web site content.

You can now use Google Gadgets to make your webpages even more interesting and useful to your visitors. For instance, you can add your city’s current temperature or a quote of the day to your own page. Just pick the gadget you want from our directory of “Google Gadgets for your webpage,â€? customize that gadget, and copy-and-paste the HTML into your page’s source code.

Channel Sponsors

Mainstream Media Preferred Over Blogs for Breaking News

ClickZ reports on a LexisNexis survey that polled consumers on where they go to get the latest news.

The study finds half of consumers turn to network television for breaking urgent news, 42 percent rely on radio, about a third look to local newspapers or cable news outlets, and a quarter use the Internet sites of print and broadcast media. Blogs, Internet user groups and chat rooms are a source of immediate news for only 6 percent of consumers.

Of course, the survey doesn’t include details of how many “breaking news” stories start at a blog or forum, before being picked-up by mainstream media. So, while consumers may not turn to blogs first, you can bet that your NBC or Wall Street Journal journalist does! ;-)

Yahoo Sponsored Search Now on Cell Phones

Yahoo has just announced the beta launch of sponsored search results on the company’s Mobile Web service in the USA and UK.

With the beta launch, Yahoo is only offering the service to a limited number of advertisers. According to Yahoo…

Consumers will be able to click on the sponsored search results to go to the advertisers’ mobile web site or a landing page to get more information about the advertisers’ offerings, including the ability to call the advertiser. As the beta phase progresses, Yahoo! will work to expand the number of participating advertisers.

Links That Generate Click Thrus

I caused a little stir when I announced SEOmoz had generated more referrals to my Top 10 Business Mistakes Search Marketing Firms Make article, than Search Engine Watch.

Barry Schwartz takes an in-depth look at some of the reasons why Rand might have referred more visitors and what makes a compelling link in general.

I honestly think is it the community difference for why Andy noticed more traffic from SEOMoz as compared to SEW for that particular post.

I thought it would be fun to go back and see if SEOmoz referred more visitors than SEW over the long-term. The envelope please…..

SEOmoz = 318
Search Engine Watch = 610

Astute readers will notice that SEOMoz generated just 2 more visitors after my original report, while SEW generated another 302!

Google’s Eric Schmidt Talks Strategy

Time.com has an interesting interview with Google CEO Eric Schmidt.

Schmidt explains the company’s strategy behind it’s recent partnership deals.

Each of them represents a different strategic thrust. In Dell’s case, if you look at the demographic of who they sell to, they’re heavy Google users, so they were a logical big partner for software distribution for us. In the case of MySpace, it’s generally well known that they are the breakout in social networks. Everybody’s moving to MySpace, basically. And all the numbers say that their growth rate is much higher than anybody else’s. They’re much, much larger than the others. Intuit has something like 80 or 90% market share of the stage that they’re in. Adobe has somewhere between 80 and 90% of their market space.

Amazon Strips A9 of Search Features

I’m a little puzzled as to why Amazon has decided to remove some key features from its A9 search engine. When it first launch, they made a bid deal of their personalized search options and street-level images of major cities. With the update, those features vanish.

The Internet retailer removed the functions, along with several others, late Friday. Amazon.com spokesman Drew Herdener said the company is “shifting its priorities to areas where it can provide the greatest benefit for customers.”

I guess they discovered either users didn’t like, or use the features, or the company simply couldn’t scale the technology to accomodate a larger user-base.