Google Wants You to Forget Financial Forecast

Coming soon to the Google store, their own Men in Black “flashy thing”. Yes, Google would like the entire industry to completely wipe from their minds the fact that they accidently posted internal projections for 2006.

The material, including a projection that Google’s revenue will rise by about 55 percent this year to $9.5 billion…besides forecasting its revenue, Google indicated its robust profit margins might weaken this year as more its rivals try to lure away some of its advertising partners

While Google claims in its SEC filing “these notes were not created for financial planning purposes, and should not be regarded as financial guidance,” you can’t help think that they have to have some sliver of reliability.

Comments for Dan Gillmor – Bloggers and Disclosure

Apparently you have to be “logged in” in order to share your views with Dan Gillmor. Sorry, while I accept that’s your policy, I don’t have time.

Instead, here is what I wanted to say about Dan’s commentary on the NYT article.

Most bloggers do not consider themselves to be journalists. I for one, consider myself as a commentator on a particular industry, not a journalist. If Wal-Mart or any other company wants to treat me like a journalist, I’m fine with that. Just don’t expect me to be predictable. Sometimes, it’s just easier to cut and paste what I have been sent, especially if it’s close to what I would have written anyway.

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Every single day, someone, somewhere is discussing something important to your business; your brand, your executives, your competitors, your industry. Are they hyping-up your company, building buzz for your products? Or, are they criticizing your service, complaining to others about your new product launch?

A great brand can take months, if not years, and millions of dollars to build. It should be the thing you hold most precious.

It can be destroyed in hours by a blogger upset with your company.

A new product launch could take hundreds of TV commercials, dozens of newspaper ads, and an expensive ad agency.

Copywriting Spam

Lee Gomes of the WSJ uncovers how some web site owners undertake the task of adding unique content to help with their search engine rankings. He posed as a freelance copywriter and was asked to “create” new content from existing copy.

My job, it became clear, was to make enough small changes to the text for Whirlywinds to be able to pass it off to search engines as his own. Which is, in fact, what most of the “original content” on these sites turns out to be: cut-and-paste jobs with superficial modifications.

Is today national “Cut and Paste” day? :-)

Hat-tip Barry.

Google Base Launches Seller Rating System

Google Base is becoming more like eBay each day. The service is now offering a rating system for sellers where buyers can offer their reviews of a merchant.

Via Wingo.

Wal-Mart Enlists Bloggers, New York Times Goes Off

The New York Times manages to make a huge story from the fact that some bloggers apparently “cut and paste” whole sentences sent to them by Wal-Mart and other companies.

Sheesh. I see this all the time with online news media – especially executive quotes from press releases. Why is it such a big scandal that bloggers do the same?

It looks to me like this is just another opportunity to rip on bloggers. Let’s get this straight, bloggers don’t live by the rules of MSM, they are individuals expressing opinion and sharing their thoughts. We don’t need publishing guidelines, AP style or fact checkers. Everything you read on a blog should come with a caveat emptor. You take it as you find. If you can’t handle that, I hear the broad-sheets are crying out for your readership.

Oodle Partners with Lycos and Backpage

We’ve gotten a sneak peak at a new press release coming out later today from classified search engine Oodle. They’re announcing a new Oodle Partner Network and have signed up Lycos and Backpage as charter members.

Oodle search results are being incorporated into Lycos’ new classified marketplace, recently launched this week located at lycos.oodle.com.

“We’re excited about the launch of Lycos classifieds,� said Brian Kalinowski, chief operating officer of Lycos, Inc. “Not only can our users post classified listings for free but by partnering with Oodle, they quickly identify the most relevant listings, whether they were published on our site or elsewhere.�

Oodle results are also being added to backpage.com, a group of free community classified sites operated by local media outlets including newspapers, radio and television stations in 40 metro areas. This week results were introduced in Houston, Denver, LA, Cleveland, Tucson, Boston and San Antonio.