A Better Google Interface?

Andy Rutledge believes he’s come up with a better looking interface for the Google homepage.

Some of his critiques…

Everything on the page is grouped together, right in the center …all except for the links at the top right. Why should they go there? What sense does it make and why are those links special so as to deserve such different treatment?

His re-design…

The search categories and form interface are wrapped in a friendly looking light colored container and the categories utilize an attractive, subtle yet conspicuous “selected� indication. The search modification links are in close proximity, but outside of the interface box. This properly associates them with the search mechanism without allowing them to interfere visually to any great degree.

What if Google Made Cola?

It seems that just about any Google rumor is valid, even when the company denies it. We suggested the Google Cola is next, based on the fact that they have vending machines in the ‘plex.

That got Barry Schwartz and I thinking….what would a Google Cola look like? What would be the ingredients? Would there be people trying to reverse engineer it? Would GCM’s (Google Coke Marketers) claim that by adding their secret additive you could enhance the taste?

Head over to Search Engine Roundtable’s forums and offer your thoughts or post to your blog and let me know where to find it – we’ll link to you. ;-)

Update: Nathan offer’s his hilarious thoughts, including – “Google Cola will be unveiled as an aggregator of everyone else’s cola. Google will, of course, not ask for permission.”

Channel Sponsors

Pittsburgh Steelers Winning the AOL Search Super Bowl

If popularity is a sign of who’ll win this week’s Super Bowl, the Steelers should have it in the bag, according to new search data from AOL Search.

The predicted close match-up on the field between Pittsburgh and Seattle is much more lopsided online, with the Steelers receiving twice as many searches as the Seahawks.

Top Super Bowl-related Searches on AOLSearch.com

1 Super Bowl
2 Pittsburgh Steelers
3 Seattle Seahawks
4 Super Bowl Tickets
5 Pittsburgh Steelers Songs – scary
6 Jerome Bettis
7 Ford Field
8 Rolling Stones – which team does he play for? ;-)
9 Ben Roethlisberger
10 Troy Polamalu

Google Hints at TV Ads

Mediapost’s Erik Sass believes Google VP, Tim Armstrong hinted at TV ads while speaking at a recent conference.

“The notion is… we’re able to help advertisers break into other media, such as print, radio, and other areas, which will help the publishers themselves do better yield management…Our advertisers and publishing partners want to run their ads everywhere that makes sense for them, as long as it’s profitable.”

After the acquisition of radio ad network, dMarc, I don’t think a move to TV would surprise anyone at this stage.

Site Overlay Returns to Google Analytics

If you’ve been missing Google Analytics‘ Site Overlay feature, good news, Google has just re-enabled the feature.

Wall Street Still Loves Google

Despite dropping almost 19% in after hours trading, many analysts have raised – yes, raised – their earnings estimates for Q1, according to CNET.

Six out of 32 analysts have updated their earnings estimates for Google, bumping up their forecast to $2.06 a share for the first quarter from $2, according to Dropsey. And for its fiscal year, analysts now expect the company to generate $8.98 a share–up from previous estimates of $8.79.

Some are not as convinced…

“We’re downgrading Google primarily because of concerns about weaker-than-expected international revenue growth,” said Ben Schachter, a UBS Securities analyst. “I think they are investing heavily in that area, and that is the right thing for the company in the long term. But in the near term, it will put pressure on its margins for the next couple of quarters.”

Google Geeking at the Speed of Sound

Greg points to Google VP Marissa Mayer’s guest column at Business Week. In it, she discusses what drives innovation at Google, including just how fast things are developed.

In the case of the Toolbar Beta, several of the key features (custom buttons, shared bookmarks) were prototyped in less than a week. In fact, during the brainstorming phase, we tried out about five times as many key features — many of which we discarded after a week of prototyping. Since only 1 in every 5 to 10 ideas work out, the strategy of constraining how quickly ideas must be proven allows us try out more ideas faster, increasing our odds of success.