Yahoo’s CES Announcements

Google’s not the only search company with something to announce at CES today. Reuters reports that Yahoo is unveiling a new service that allows mobile phones and TVs to control its Web services similarly to the way computers do now.

Chief Executive Terry Semel on Friday will describe the new products — marketed under the newly established Yahoo Go brand — in a speech at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the U.S. electronics industry’s largest trade show.

The products include Yahoo Go Mobile and Yahoo Go TV. A third product, Yahoo Go Desktop, will tie the phone and TV services back to the most common way of using Yahoo services, which far and away remains the personal computer.

Sun Microsystems Sees Blog Benefit

Rubel reports Jonathan Schwartz, President and COO of Sun Microsystems is a big fan of blogging.

…blogging had played a major role in the revitalization of Sun’s reputation. Sun has gone from the 99th to the 6th most popular server company…

“Companies need to speak with one voice and be authentic. Blogging allows you to speak out authentically on your own behalf, and in the long run people will recognize that. Do it consistently and they trust you.�

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The Google Googol Keyboard

Google will probably sue the makers of the Googolboard – similar name, similar color-scheme. They’ll be upset they didn’t think of it first!

Via Gizmodo.

Update: $99!!! Ninety-nine dollars??? For that, I’d want Sergey to come and deliver it.

Can Google Pack and Video Win the Battle?

Mike Bazeley of the Mercury News covers the expected new products from Google today.

Google Video…

The Mountain View company is expected to announce plans for an online video store where people can buy a wide array of sports, entertainment and news programming from partners such as CBS and the NBA, a knowledgeable source told the Mercury News.

Google Pack…

At the same time, Page is expected to announce the availability of Google Pack, a downloadable package of Google-branded and third-party software, such as a Web browser and a media player, considered essential for most computer users. The availability of the software, first reported in the Wall Street Journal, could diminish Microsoft’s control of the computer desktop, seen by many as a key tool for driving people to use online services.

Should Google Acquire Monster.com?

Oh goody, more speculation and rumor. ;-)

This time, CNNMoney suggests that Google might consider acquiring Monster Worldwide, which runs the job site Monster.com.

…Google, with $7.6 billion in cash and a richly valued stock, could easily afford to buy Monster, which is valued at about $5 billion.

Online job listing companies like Monster are rapidly growing as they steal business from newspapers’ help-wanted sections…Allowing users to search for jobs is a natural extension for Google as it rolls out services such as personalized search, video search, and online mapping tools.

It’s certainly not outside the realms of reality but, as Google has already shown they like the strategy of buying just a stake in a large company (a la AOL), it wouldn’t make much sense to buy Monster outright and eat-up a large chunk of their war chest.

Microsoft Bashes Google

Danny and Gary manage to cover much the same topic via two separate posts. ;-)

Some interesting snippets…

Apparently in response to rumors of what Google will announce at CES, Gates said:

“I hear they’re coming out with a robot that will cook hamburgers, too. Let’s spread that rumor — there’s nothing they can’t do.”

Continuing on, Gates said:

“Whatever they announce, they announce. They’re in their honeymoon period, and anything they announce gets hype…. They will obviously branch out beyond internet search, but I think the expectations won’t live up to reality.”

Danny in particular appears to be fed-up with Microsoft trashing Google. He points out a few of Microsoft’s shortcomings in search.

Google Not Likely to Split Stock

Despite Google’s stock price getting close to $450 per share, CNet reports the company is not likely to consider a stock split.

Simply put, with demand for the search giant’s shares still going strong, Google executives have little reason to call for a split, and they may well be philosophically opposed to it.