Edgeio Brings Tagging to Classified Ads

Rob Hof succinctly describes a new service priming for launch called Edgeio.

The way Edgeio works is that bloggers would post items they want to sell right on their blogs, tagging them with the word “listing” (and eventually other descriptive tags). Then, Edgeio will pluck them as it constantly crawls millions of blogs looking for the “listing” tag and index them on Edgeio.com.

It would be interesting to see if this could be a threat to eBay. Instead of going to one central site (eBay) to list your useless junk, just post it on your own site and let Edgeio come to you.

So how will Edgeio make money?

Searches Up 55 Percent in One Year

Via MarketingVox

U.S.-based searches conducted across approximately 60 search engines in December reached nearly 5.1 billion – or an increase of 55 percent from the 3.3 billion searches conducted in Dec. 2004.

That either means the population is using the search engines more, or we’re simply not finding the information we need fast enough. ;-)

Channel Sponsors

Do You Have An Employee Blog Policy?

AlwaysOn shares some interesting survey data on employers’ blog policies.

5% of American workers maintain personal blogs and that only 15% of their employers have a policy directly addressing blogging activities

Lots more interesting stats.

coComment Changing Orphaned Blog Comments


Worried that when you comment on a blog, you’ll either forget about the conversation or, worse still, your comment will be an orphan, left to fend for itself?

coComment appears to be the solution. The invite only service allows you to capture, share and monitor the comments and conversations you have on various blogs.

I’m not sure how much I’m going to use it, but I think it will turn out to be a very useful tool.

Thanks to Lee for the invite! If the creators of coComment are reading – I’d love some more invites to share with my “cool” blogging friends. ;-)

Your Corporate Reputation is at Risk

If you’re still not monitoring what is being said about your company, maybe this chilling article in The Economist will be your wake-up call.

In the blogosphere, however, a corporation’s next big critic could be anyone. He might be an angry customer or a disgruntled employee—though that sort of tie to the company is not essential; nor does he need lots of industry experience or lengthy credentials to be a threat. All a blogger really needs to devastate a company is a bit of information and plausibility, a complaint that catches the imagination and a knack for making others care about his gripe.

$100+ million in advertising and branding for one year can be nullified by the voice of a single blogger. Scary huh?

Via Rubel.

Good Luck Gary Price

Best wishes and lots of luck to Gary Price as he departs Search Engine Watch and joins Ask Jeeves as Director of Online Information Resources.

Barry Schwartz will be taking over from where Gary left off. He may be nervous, but I know he’ll do a great job.

Verizon All Bark and No Bite With Google

Never has “all bark and no bite” been more appropriate than news that, just days after Verizon seemingly challenged Google’s free ride of phone companies’ infrastructure, the telecom giant is backing down.

Verizon Communications Chief Executive Ivan Seidenberg retreated from a vice president’s sharp statements panning search giant Google but affirmed the telecom industry’s desire for new revenue from Internet content companies.

Via Forbes.